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Keep Your Research Engaging Using Skip Logic


Sep 20, 2013, By Philippe Aussant
|0 comments

Keeping your research questions relevant and engaging for your survey respondents is one of the ways in which Skip Logic can prove to be valuable
The process of designing a survey and deciding which questions to include is an exciting one. Everyone wants to collect as much data as possible and draw as much insight as possible from each respondent. For some survey questions, such as Overall Satisfaction, Purpose of Visit, Task Completion, and Likelihood to Recommend, asking every respondent works well. By asking these questions you can keep a finger on the pulse of your website, and identify any notable changes in your visitors’ overall experience with your website. 

However, sometimes you may want to start getting more specific with your research, and only target certain respondents with certain questions.  For example, you may want to ask specific questions with regards to the purchasing process.  Understandably, these types of questions would not likely be relevant to all respondents (e.g. those who primarily visited your website to access their account or read a blog post).  Instead, you may want only to ask these questions to those who stated that they were visiting your website to make a purchase.  Keeping your research questions relevant and engaging for your survey respondents is one of the ways in which Skip Logic can prove to be valuable, while it can also be beneficial when it comes time to analyze your data.

Whenever possible, you should consider using Skip Logic for your surveys for the following reasons: 

  1. Tailor-make your surveys to each respondent: Specify which respondents will see which questions depending on their previous answers, as opposed to offering the same general survey to each of your respondents
  2. Keep your survey short: Skip Logic allows you to turn a potentially long survey into a specific and engaging one, in turn ensuring that the level of respondents who abandon your survey before completing is kept to a minimum  
  3. Simplify your analysis: Asking only certain questions to certain respondents means not having to apply and manage as many (if any) filters when analyzing the data for these questions, since they were only answered by the precise respondents that you wanted

Whenever accepting the invitation for your survey, your website visitors are volunteering to take the time to let you know more about their experience, in hopes that their feedback may be considered for any future changes to your website.  As such, you should ensure that their time is rewarded with an engaging survey where they do not experience respondent fatigue, and instead make them feel like the survey is customized to learn more about their own personal experience with your website.  The ability to apply Skip Logic can help ensure that these goals are met, while also easily allowing you to collect more targeted and actionable feedback in the process.

Image source: Ivan Dervisevic

 


 

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Philippe Aussant

Philippe Aussant is a research analyst and support professional with over 6 years of experience. As Product Support Manager, Philippe is responsible for managing client support requests and the iPerceptions support forum, as well as creating documentation and user guides for the Active Research platform.

Keep Your Research Engaging Using Skip Logic


Sep 20, 2013, By Philippe Aussant
|0 comments

Keeping your research questions relevant and engaging for your survey respondents is one of the ways in which Skip Logic can prove to be valuable
The process of designing a survey and deciding which questions to include is an exciting one. Everyone wants to collect as much data as possible and draw as much insight as possible from each respondent. For some survey questions, such as Overall Satisfaction, Purpose of Visit, Task Completion, and Likelihood to Recommend, asking every respondent works well. By asking these questions you can keep a finger on the pulse of your website, and identify any notable changes in your visitors’ overall experience with your website. 

However, sometimes you may want to start getting more specific with your research, and only target certain respondents with certain questions.  For example, you may want to ask specific questions with regards to the purchasing process.  Understandably, these types of questions would not likely be relevant to all respondents (e.g. those who primarily visited your website to access their account or read a blog post).  Instead, you may want only to ask these questions to those who stated that they were visiting your website to make a purchase.  Keeping your research questions relevant and engaging for your survey respondents is one of the ways in which Skip Logic can prove to be valuable, while it can also be beneficial when it comes time to analyze your data.

Whenever possible, you should consider using Skip Logic for your surveys for the following reasons: 

  1. Tailor-make your surveys to each respondent: Specify which respondents will see which questions depending on their previous answers, as opposed to offering the same general survey to each of your respondents
  2. Keep your survey short: Skip Logic allows you to turn a potentially long survey into a specific and engaging one, in turn ensuring that the level of respondents who abandon your survey before completing is kept to a minimum  
  3. Simplify your analysis: Asking only certain questions to certain respondents means not having to apply and manage as many (if any) filters when analyzing the data for these questions, since they were only answered by the precise respondents that you wanted

Whenever accepting the invitation for your survey, your website visitors are volunteering to take the time to let you know more about their experience, in hopes that their feedback may be considered for any future changes to your website.  As such, you should ensure that their time is rewarded with an engaging survey where they do not experience respondent fatigue, and instead make them feel like the survey is customized to learn more about their own personal experience with your website.  The ability to apply Skip Logic can help ensure that these goals are met, while also easily allowing you to collect more targeted and actionable feedback in the process.

Image source: Ivan Dervisevic

 


 

Did you enjoy this article? Subscribe today
Receive regular updates from The Customer-Centric Marketer straight to your inbox
Philippe Aussant

Philippe Aussant is a research analyst and support professional with over 6 years of experience. As Product Support Manager, Philippe is responsible for managing client support requests and the iPerceptions support forum, as well as creating documentation and user guides for the Active Research platform.